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December 20, 2008

GOOSENECKS & OTHER FITTINGS

I decided to make the piece of the goose necks which is attached to the mast of carbon. I took a pieces from an broken mast and made molds of them. That they would not collapse under the tremendous pressure in the autoklav I filled them with wood. To get release I have covered them with Teflon.

A 10 mm rod is winded with carbon 45 degrees in both directions to make a hole for the axis.

Then carbon is laid on the mold, then on rod and mold.

Here the pieces are after having been cured in the autoklave.

Francois our Frenchman is helping me to glue them to the mast. He is so fast that it is difficult to get a picture of him. Finally I got my chance when he built a tent with three 2-kilo-watts space heaters to cure the glue.

Below is the mast with the three goose necks on it.

Below is the centerboard being laminated.

The next day I peel of the peel- ply. I do not have the strength of my youth.

I have to use all my force.

Here I have been shaping the attach point for the steering line on the rudder head.

Here it has been laminated

Below. In the meantime, B├Ârje who makes Marstr├Âms stainless steel fitting have been kind enough to make some also for me.

Here is the axis which shall connect the rudder head and the rudder blade.

Below is the end fittings for the booms. In this case the heavy weather boom which also serves as a club at the end of a sprit boom to hold out a down wind sail opposite to the sprit sail.

Below close up

Below is the mast head fitting. It has several functions. The pin on the right side is to take a small rope lope. I do not have halyards but intend to push the sail up in its track so that the loop falls over the pin and then pull the sail down. To lower the sail I push it up again, then twist the mast. The intention is that now the loop on its way down misses the pin.

To the left is is a pipe which is going to take a pin from the top mast. It also serves as a point of attachment for the genua.

The bar between them is for me to hold on to when I climb the mast. It also serves as attachment point for back stays, running downwind. Running down wind I do not worry about wind resistance.




December 2, 2008

THE SPARS ARE DONE

Among a few thousand other things, Sam is a drummer in his spare time. Naturally he has built his own electronic drums of carbon fiber. Here he is jumping on the very light drum support pipe to show me how flexible carbon is. My mast of glass is twice as flexible as my other spars which are of carbon. Sailing south of Cape Horn among the icebergs there should not even be a doubt in my mind about the strength of my spars, not even during hurricane force winds. Everything is very strong and not very light. A carbon mast I am sure would have been strong enough at less than half the weight.

Here I am unpacking a spar just out of the autoklave, cutting up the vacumbag and removing the felt and peelply and release film.

G├Âran and Per, the owners of Marstr├Âms inspecting the spars which all fits inside my Volkswagen.
Per said: Thats a lot of spars.
G├Âran said: I would not call them spars.
Building a small cruising boat among the high performance multihulls I have to stand a lot of teasing.

Here I am home in my workshop regarding my treasure.

As can be seen I use quite rugged lay up.

During the workdays I have been to the Marstr├Âm factory. During the week ends I work on the rudder and centerboard. Here is the rudder head. I am moulding the cone for the port stearing line. there will be another on the rudderblade for the starboard stearing line.

I have also been to G├Âteborg making money doing a lecture. At the same time I got a spare par of eye glasses. Also I was visiting the Garmin office discussing GPS and charts.
The work continues, there is a lot of goosenecks toggles, and other things to fit to the spars.




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